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Welcome back (to the school year)

Hello dear readers!

After a long hiatus this summer, BMS Cartoons is soon returning.

This summer, I’ve gotten really busy as Editor of Synapse, the UCSF newspaper that publishes my cartoons in a biweekly column during the school year. I’m also, idk, trying to do enough work in lab to graduate at some point in this lifetime? (I’m hoping me being Editor doesn’t just mean that the newspaper becomes insufferably snarky. But maybe there’s no such thing!)

You can get regular updates from me through the Synapse Facebook page (perhaps slightly more regular than this blog right now, whoops).

Also, if you follow me on Facebook, this is probably the third time you’re seeing this hedgehog photo from my Philippines trip, but it’s so cute! LOOK at its silly little face and its tongue sticking out and its fuzzy belly! LOOK AT IT. California, why do you not allow hedgehogs as pets??

And for me, it’s a reminder of how awesome it is to be alive. Literally. My UCSF friend (that’s her hand holding the hedgehog) and I got lost in the woods and climbed up a wall of thorns before finding the path again, and then we saw that there was a store selling hedgehogs! So we asked to hold one, because we were thinking, “Eff, we just climbed up a wall of thorns and could have been bitten by a motherloving cobra. We deserve to hold a tiny adorable animal and have this tiny adorable animal lick our hands with its tiny adorable tongue.”

Anyway, I digress. Point is, being alive is mostly awesome, and hedgehogs are cute. I also like to think my blobs with faces are cute. I will be posting my doodles of blobs with faces again soon, and this year, I’ll post them BEFORE they reach Synapse. But you should still check out Synapse too. We have cool content. Sometimes it’s snarky because it’s written by grad students. We have a lot of built-up snark.

Oh, and to make this post pretend to be scientific, here’s a fun fact about hedgehogs!

In New Zealand, hedgehogs are considered to be an invasive species to native insects, lizards and ground-nesting birds. (Normally, hedgehogs only eat insects, but these have had to expand their diets because they kill so many insects and have no natural predators.) In Scotland, folks tried to kill off invasive hedgehogs to protect the native birds starting in 2003, and these attempts were met with rage and legal action. Here are some of the responses from children all over the world, some of which are funny and cute, some of which are actually pretty impressively intelligent:

Instead of moving the hedgehogs or killing them, why not move the birds to a new location.”—Katie, 10, Colorado, USA

"I think that they shouldn’t kill the hedgehogs because they don’t know that they shouldn’t eat the eggs, they haven’t been told. They don’t know it’s making these bird’s extinct. Just like us they are trying to survive, and just like us they have to eat too."—Leah, 11, Tunbridge Wells
I agree with the protection of the endangered birds on the island off Scotland. However, I disagree with the proposed plan which seems to me the most convenient for people. I saw on a TV programme a woman from the Hedgehog protection society claiming that they had put forward a plan to remove the hedgehogs from the island and relocate them on the mainland. But the man she was talking to never responded to her statement and just kept saying that a cull was the only way to deal with the problem. Surely with the use of humane traps and some intelligent people, these hedgehogs could be removed from the island without them dying. I do not believe that killing them is the only option and if you do believe that killing them is the only option then I think you are not very smart.”—Teya, 11, Leicester
I have a hedgehog in my garden who creeps into my old rabbit-hutch where I leave food for him, I call him Gareth Gates. If that isn’t cute enough to spare their lives, I don’t know what is!”—Sophie, 10, France
I find hedgehogs one of the most adorable creatures on the earth. Killing them off WON’T solve their problem. They will also be ruining the food chain which will end up making other animals endangered as well.”—Katherine, 11, Alton
There you have it. Cuteness and science should be sufficient reason to save anything. I got sucked into reading all of those responses over at the BBC.

Love,

JQ

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Remember my crazy skinned knee incident?
Yeah. This series is turning into “the many concerns and afflictions of JQ”

Remember my crazy skinned knee incident?

Yeah. This series is turning into “the many concerns and afflictions of JQ”

Am I not allowed to draw characters that resemble Smurfs? I should probably figure this out.
Anyway, it’s SF summer, which means it’s effing cold.
And even though we know cold weather can’t directly make you sick, a whole lot of stuff can right now. If you get sick, don’t damage your liver, kiddies. That’s what Grandpa should really be saying.

Am I not allowed to draw characters that resemble Smurfs? I should probably figure this out.

Anyway, it’s SF summer, which means it’s effing cold.

And even though we know cold weather can’t directly make you sick, a whole lot of stuff can right now. If you get sick, don’t damage your liver, kiddies. That’s what Grandpa should really be saying.

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Eep, I still struggle with this.
(I really like saying “eep” right now.)

Eep, I still struggle with this.

(I really like saying “eep” right now.)

Eeep, sorry guys, I slacked off a bit in posting during Spring Quarter. But that just means you actually get cartoons over the summer, woo!
New followers, hi! Welcome to BMS Cartoons, where I try to teach science by drawing cute blobs. Usually, summers are mostly crickets punctuated by reblogs, but this week there are cartoons!
Also, I actually met with Alison Boden because I was like, “Hey, I keep fainting because I’m anemic and have low blood pressure and have been sort of trying to be a vegetarian and am (half)-marathon training. This whole eating thing is hard for me. Help?”
And she was like, “Um, some people can pull off being a vegetarian. You are not one of them. Eat more salt and red meat, girl.”
And then, more importantly, she said, “Oh hey, you’re the girl who drew that cartoon! We all loved it!”
Note: This is not actually how this conversation went, but it was all kind of fun(ny).

Eeep, sorry guys, I slacked off a bit in posting during Spring Quarter. But that just means you actually get cartoons over the summer, woo!

New followers, hi! Welcome to BMS Cartoons, where I try to teach science by drawing cute blobs. Usually, summers are mostly crickets punctuated by reblogs, but this week there are cartoons!

Also, I actually met with Alison Boden because I was like, “Hey, I keep fainting because I’m anemic and have low blood pressure and have been sort of trying to be a vegetarian and am (half)-marathon training. This whole eating thing is hard for me. Help?”

And she was like, “Um, some people can pull off being a vegetarian. You are not one of them. Eat more salt and red meat, girl.”

And then, more importantly, she said, “Oh hey, you’re the girl who drew that cartoon! We all loved it!”

Note: This is not actually how this conversation went, but it was all kind of fun(ny).

(Source: iraffiruse, via npr)

huffingtonpost:

People have offered many potential explanations for this discrepancy, but this ad highlights the importance of the social cues that push girls away from math and science in their earliest childhood years.

Watch the powerful Verizon advertisement to really understand what a little girl hears when you tell her she’s pretty.

(Source: youtube.com)

kqedscience:


Cancer-resistant blind mole rat gets genome sequence"Scientists have sequenced the genome of the blind mole rat, a mammal that digs with its teeth, has skin over its eyes and lives for more than 20 years.Its underground lifestyle means coping with no light, very little oxygen and an awful lot of dirt.It is also resistant to cancer, like its distant cousin the naked mole rat.The new work, published in the journal Nature Communications, will help unpick those secrets and the wider adaptation of animals to difficult environments.” 
Learn more from bbcnews.

kqedscience:

Cancer-resistant blind mole rat gets genome sequence

"Scientists have sequenced the genome of the blind mole rat, a mammal that digs with its teeth, has skin over its eyes and lives for more than 20 years.

Its underground lifestyle means coping with no light, very little oxygen and an awful lot of dirt.

It is also resistant to cancer, like its distant cousin the naked mole rat.

The new work, published in the journal Nature Communications, will help unpick those secrets and the wider adaptation of animals to difficult environments.” 

Learn more from bbcnews.

(via natashamakengo)


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